Exploiting Same Origin Method Execution Vulnerabilities

Recently it came to my attention that it was possible to abuse JSONP callbacks using a vulnerability known as SOME – Same Origin Method Execution which can be used by an attacker to widely abuse a user’s trust between the web application and the intended flow of execution. For example, using the SOME attack it is possible for an attacker to trick a user to visiting a malicious web-page which…

My Robot Has WiFi!

Wireless communication using Bluetooth! Thanks to the Adafruit EZ-Link!  Basically that tiny board sticking out on top is a Bluetooth Serial-Link, allows me to remove the cable that binds the robot to my PC / MAC.  Now I cannot only program the robot wirelessly, but if I choose to, I can send it commands wirelessly over the air – thus completing Asimov’s second rule of robotics (if you don’t know the…

It Can See; Giving Your Bot Sight!

Previously we unveiled our love for the Arduino and the Zumo Shield that gives us a massive head start to building our own robot army.  The basic shield has a Zumo reflectance sensor array for primarily line following, and an LSM303DLHC accelerometer & magnometer (magnet-o-meter) for navigation.  But a lot of the remaining Arduino pins are not used, so this gives us the capability to add more tech or sensors so our robot can…

Yet Another HeartBleed.

This Heartbleed Information Disclosure Vulnerability has pretty much been covered all over the internet today (8th April 2014).  As a one-page-stop summary, please read below: An online site exists to check vulnerabilities: http://filippo.io/Heartbleed/ Source Code available at: https://github.com/FiloSottile/Heartbleed A python script (thats much better): http://s3.jspenguin.org/ssltest.py A second version of above code with STARTTLS Support: https://gist.github.com/takeshixx/10107280 A good breakout of why the bug exists is here: http://blog.existentialize.com/diagnosis-of-the-openssl-heartbleed-bug.html Watching twitter has been entertaining, login.yahoo.com has been leaking user…

Rise of the Machines: Arduino Bots

Robotics Week Its robotics week (April 5th – 13th) 2014 (http://www.nationalroboticsweek.org), on Arduino Day (29th March 2014) I posed the question “What will you Build?”.  Well here in the Pentura office, we went out and bought some Zumo Shields from Pololu.  The shields are also available from our favourite electronics provider Adafruit.  The shield is a quick an easy insertable arduino shield that slides perfectly into place on an Arduino Uno R3…

Proxmark3 vs Ultralight C

There have been no secrets this week while I’ve been trying to add Mifare Ultralight C support to the Proxmark. Ultralight C cards are HF (13.56MHz) tags that are part of the Mifare family.  This week has been an interesting learning process, and it has corrected some misconceptions I had about the card.  For those interested you can follow my progress at http://www.proxmark.org/forum/viewtopic.php?id=1946.  But I will summarise my findings below: Ultralight C…

Proxmark3 vs Kantech ioProx

Earlier today we released a patch into the Proxmark3 community for initial support of the LF 125kHz ioProx tags from Kantech.  Current operations are FSK-demodulation and card/tag cloning. Not much is revealed about this type of tag, and only limited data can be found on its data sheet.  Kantech state that readers/cards are compatible with standard 26-bit Wiegand and Kantech Extended Secure Format (XSF). But it is difficult to find…

Ubertooth – Bluetooth Sniffing Updated for 2014!

Earlier I noticed this tweet on my twitter feed: Ubertooth release: https://t.co/cCYHNf34Yc I know it’s been a long time coming, I promise not to leave it so long next time. — Dominic Spill (@dominicgs) February 20, 2014 So I thought I would walk you through the update, which has improved Operating System support, improved Bluetooth Low Energy (BTLE) support, and GitHub integration to make community development easier….

Whitehatsec’s Aviator

A new web browser is brought to us from Whitehatsec called Aviator, built for speed, security and privacy.  Its based on the Open-Source Chromium browser and can utilise many of Chrome’s browser plugins. The browser boasts that with every website you visit, you are potentially vulnerable to malicious hackers out to steal your surfing history, passwords, email access, bank account numbers, medical info, and more. That the “big browsers” don’t do enough…