How to Create Mark V Pineapple Infusions/Plugins

Introduction The Pineapple (since Mark IV) has introduced the idea of infusions; community written plugins that when approved become available on the Pineapple-Bar for all to use.  Since the introduction of Interface 3.0/Mk4 or 1.0/Mk5 these infusions have changed to a more uniformed modular approach.  This has the following benefits: easier to create modular design similar code-base (easier to review) generally more secure code Now creating new plugins may seem…

WiFi Pineapple; Decrypting SSL Traffic on Mobile Applications

Introduction Most people view the WiFi Pineapple as in intrusive piece of kit. Marketed as a WiFi device that can trick unsuspecting clients to connect to the AccessPoint (AP) because the device is sending out Probe responses that match devices Probe requests.  From there a victim is then susceptible to Man-in-The-Middle (MiTM) attacks, interception and traffic manipulation.  The device has been famously used on Channel 4’s Derren Browns Apocalypse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derren_Brown:_Apocalypse),…

Naked WiFi Pineapple Mark V!

Introduction We will take a look at the new Mark V insides, the board, the kernel and its interfaces: Specification CPU: 400 MHz MIPS Atheros AR9331 version 1 SoC http://www.eeboard.com/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2013/08/AR9331.pdf Memory: 16 MB ROM (w25q128 (16384 Kbytes)), 64 MB DDR2 RAM (Hynix H5PS5162GFR-Y5C) Disk: Micro SD support up to 32 GB, FAT or EXT, 2 GB Included Mode Select: 5 DIP Switches – 2 System, 3 User configurable Wireless: Atheros AR9331 IEEE 802.11 b/g/n +…

USB Rubber Ducky – Part 3: Crypto Duck

Background The USB Rubber Ducky is an extremely powerful and versatile device.  Sadly, the potential is missed, and this is probably due to its high price tag (from an initial small development production run).  Since its release mid-late 2011, the Ducky has grown in popularity and the Hak5 Team have more than doubled their production run, meaning costs have been slashed in half.  Potentially with enough interest and investment the…

USB Rubber Ducky – Part 2: Attack of the HID

Background The USB Rubber Ducky was introduced in our previous post “The Return of USB Auto-Run Attacks“.  This is the first of many follow-ups, that introduce new attack scenarios and the increase in functionality, that really makes this tiny device a big part of the hearts of penetration testers. Brute-force attacks…

The Return of USB “Auto-Run” Attacks

Background USB Autorun attacks became the rage back in 2005.  Hak5 created a project to increase awareness of this security issue called USB-Hacksaw, originally a U3 device that would auto-run a series of programs.  This could be used from general system administration tasks, or potential malicious tasks; such as installing back-doors and running password collection programs.  Shortly, Vendors like Microsoft started to remove Auto-run capabilities to prevent more serious malware…