Yet Another HeartBleed.

This Heartbleed Information Disclosure Vulnerability has pretty much been covered all over the internet today (8th April 2014).  As a one-page-stop summary, please read below: An online site exists to check vulnerabilities: http://filippo.io/Heartbleed/ Source Code available at: https://github.com/FiloSottile/Heartbleed A python script (thats much better): http://s3.jspenguin.org/ssltest.py A second version of above code with STARTTLS Support: https://gist.github.com/takeshixx/10107280 A good breakout of why the bug exists is here: http://blog.existentialize.com/diagnosis-of-the-openssl-heartbleed-bug.html Watching twitter has been entertaining, login.yahoo.com has been leaking user…

WiFi Pineapple; Decrypting SSL Traffic on Mobile Applications

Introduction Most people view the WiFi Pineapple as in intrusive piece of kit. Marketed as a WiFi device that can trick unsuspecting clients to connect to the AccessPoint (AP) because the device is sending out Probe responses that match devices Probe requests.  From there a victim is then susceptible to Man-in-The-Middle (MiTM) attacks, interception and traffic manipulation.  The device has been famously used on Channel 4’s Derren Browns Apocalypse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derren_Brown:_Apocalypse),…

Creating Your Own Certificate Authority | InteliSecure

Background Being a pentester I often have to tackle the issue of self-signed certificates on the internal network.  All our automated tools (Nessus, Nexpose, OpenVas) flag several SSL issues related to untrusted certificates, weak ciphers, weak hashing algorithms and self-signed certificates.  The usual advice is to disable weak ciphers, and to re-issue and re-sign the certificates.  The big question from customers is “But why should we purchase certificates for servers…